Saturday, June 24, 2017
Blog Page 8

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“A MASTERPIECE OF VIRTUOSITY: SIMILAR TO 18TH-CENTRURY IVORY FURNITURE, STRAIGHT FROM A COMPUTER”

It’s been a while since the initial launch in 2007, however the magic “Fall of the Damned Chandelier” designed by Dutch architect Luc Merx and printed by MGX.Materialise is still intriguing and very impressive. Consisting of a cluster of writhing human bodies and based on the notion of the fall of the damned, the lamp is made of white selective laser sintered polyamide.

3DPrinting.Lighting_Fall-of-the-Damned-Chandelier_Side_Top view
Fall of the Damned Chandelier : a 3D printed masterpiece about guilt and morality.

Seamless Masterpiece as One Part

The Damned.MGX chandelier was produced using additive layered fabrication as one piece, without joints or seams, and would be impossible to produce using other manufacturing methods. It appears as a hovering mass of writhing nudes – opulent and bombastic – and recalls the classical motif of the fall of the damned, challenging viewers with age-old questions of guilt and morality.

3DPrinting.Lighting_Fall-of-the-Damned-Chandelier_Greyscale

Unlimited Design Freedom

The lamp is a masterpiece of virtuosity, similar to that of 18th-century ivory furniture, but the difference is that this is not the result of our virtuosity, but that of a computer. The new questions about the possibilities of forms posed by this originate in a new understanding of technology. Technology no longer generates the forces, which determine the design of goods, but it enables an incredible range of possibilities and thus creates a new freedom of form.

3DPrinting.Lighting_Fall-of-the-Damned-Chandelier_original art_Comparison
Fall-of-the-Damned-Chandelier: 21st Century Masterpiece compared to the original 18th Century Painting.

Difference in Design Approach

The answer to this new freedom is not the voluntary self-restriction usually applied in modern design. Instead it’s the roam to work freely in the myriads of possibilities given to us. When considering design in this way, the design reflects the situation of the designer himself!

 

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“3D PRINTED LED OPTICS: STRAIGHT FROM THE PRINTER WITH ONLY ONE STEP FROM CAD-TO-OPTIC”

LUXeXceL Group, a company having it’s head quarters and technology center in Goes, Netherlands, offers services for Optics Design and Additive Manufacturing of LED Optics. The process – called ‘Printoptical Technology’ – 3D prints optical structures and elements using modified wide format industrial inkjet equipment.

LUXeXceL - One Step CAD-to-Optic
3D Printed LED Optics – In only one step from a digital CAD to an functional optics end product.

 

Jetting and Curing

Transparent droplets of a UV-curable polymer are jetted and then cured by strong UV-lamps which are integrated onto the print head. The results of the printoptical process are geometric or freeform shapes that may include transparent prisms or lenses, as well as full color 3D graphics and textures, all in a single print job.

Droplets on Demand

The key element of the Printoptical Technology is the piezoelectric controllable print head, which provides a resolution of 1,440 dpi or greater. Even though the material is deposited in discrete drops, the resulting surface is smooth. This is accomplished by delaying the time between the jetting of the droplets and the application of UV light, which gives the polymer time to flow and for each droplet to lose its spherical form.

Optical surfaces – no post-processing

The results of the process are geometric or freeform shapes that may include transparent prisms or lenses, as well as full color 3D graphics and textures. Optical quality surfaces are achieved with no post processing. Printoptical Technology avoids complicated and costly conventional processes, gets rid of obsolete stock and shortens the time to market significantly.

More about LUXeXceL’s inventive Printoptical Technology – the key to 3D printed LED optics is available at the companies website. If you’d like to further dive into the world of additive manufacturing, please also refer to a more extensive article on 3D printing of complete lighting fixtures elsewhere on this website.

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